Autism co-morbidity in Epilepsy – New Spanish Research

Prognosis of symptomatic epilepsies in relation to their age of onset, monitored at a neuropediatric section of regional reference over a period of three years].

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26961422

AIM:

To analyze the factors involved in the prognosis of symptomatic epilepsies in relation to their age at onset, monitored at a neuropediatric section of regional reference over a period of three years.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Children diagnosed with symptomatic epilepsy, supervised from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010, collecting epidemiological, clinical and developmental data.

RESULTS:

Of the 4595 children attended during the period, the diagnosis of epilepsy was established at 605 (13.17%): 277 (45.79%) symptomatic epilepsies. Symptomatic etiology predomininates in epileptic patients that started below one year of age, 67.72%, and between 1-3 years, 61.39%. 37.54% of symptomatic epilepsy is refractory, 72.92% have cognitive impairment, 55.23% have motor impairment and 17.32% have autism spectrum disorder. The younger the patient, the higher the percentage of refractoriness and display of any neurological or associated development impact. Some etiologies have higher rates of refractoriness.

CONCLUSIONS:

A useful classification would be etiological, with two groups: a large group with established etiology or very likely genetic syndromes and another with no established cause. The age of onset of epilepsy in each etiological group adds prognostic orientation. Prognosis of epilepsy is overshadowed by refractoriness and associated neurodevelopmental disorders, which are generally worse at an earlier onset and in certain etiologies.

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Further Readings of Interest

https://asdresearchinitiative.wordpress.com/?s=epilepsy

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This entry was posted in Autism, co-morbid, epilepsy, Neurology, Treatment. Bookmark the permalink.

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