Current Diagnosis of Psychiatric Disorders based on Symptoms – Time for a Change

The Missing Link between Clinical States and Biomarkers in Mental Disorders

http://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/360348

Full Text at Link

Current diagnostic definitions of psychiatric disorders based on collections of symptoms encompass very heterogeneous populations and are thus likely to yield spurious results when exploring biological correlates of mental disturbances.

It has been suggested that large studies of biomarkers across diagnostic entities may yield improved clinical information.

Such a view is based on the concept of assessment as a collection of symptoms devoid of any clinical judgment and interpretation. Yet, important advances have been made in recent years in clinimetrics, the science of clinical judgment.

The current clinical taxonomy in psychiatry, which emphasizes reliability at the cost of clinical validity, does not include effects of comorbid conditions, timing of phenomena, rate of progression of an illness, responses to previous treatments, and other clinical distinctions that demarcate major prognostic and therapeutic differences among patients who otherwise seem to be deceptively similar since they share the same psychiatric diagnosis.

Clinimetrics may provide the missing link between clinical states and biomarkers in psychiatry, building pathophysiological bridges from clinical manifestations to their neurobiological counterparts.

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Further Readings of Interest

Comorbidity clusters in autism spectrum disorders: an electronic health record time-series analysis.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24323995

Issac Kohane – TedMed 2013

From TEDMED 2013: Biomedical informaticist, physician, and i2b2 founder Isaac Kohane wants to turn hospital data systems into “living laboratories” to study the genetic basis of disease.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P5O66e8r2QM

 

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This entry was posted in Autism, co-morbid, Environment, Neurology, Physiology, Treatment. Bookmark the permalink.

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