Mitochondrial Disorder and Epilepsy

Mitochondrial disorders and epilepsy.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24810279

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Mitochondrial respiratory chain defects (RCD) often exhibit multiorgan involvement, affecting mainly tissues with high-energy requirements such as the brain. Epilepsy is frequent during the evolution of mitochondrial disorders (30%) with different presentation in childhood and adulthood in term of type of epilepsy, of efficacy of treatment and also in term of prognosis.

STATE OF ART:

Mitochondrial disorders can begin at any age but the diseases with early onset during childhood have generally severe or fatal outcome in few years. Four age-related epileptic phenotypes could be identified in infancy: infantile spasms, refractory or recurrent status epilepticus, epilepsia partialis continua and myoclonic epilepsy. Except for infantile spasms, epilepsy is difficult to control in most cases (95%). In pediatric patients, mitochondrial epilepsy is more frequent due to mutations in nDNA-located than mtDNA-located genes and vice versa in adults. Ketogenic diet could be an interesting alternative treatment in case of recurrent status epilepticus or pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

CONCLUSION:

Epileptic seizures increase the energy requirements of the metabolically already compromised neurons establishing a vicious cycle resulting in worsening energy failure and neuronal death.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

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Further Readings of Interest

Mitochondria

https://asdresearchinitiative.wordpress.com/?s=mitochondria

Epilepsy

https://asdresearchinitiative.wordpress.com/?s=epilepsy

 

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