Saliva – Dysbiosis – Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Dysbiosis of Salivary Microbiota in Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Its Association With Oral Immunological Biomarkers.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24013298

Abstract

Analysis of microbiota in various biological and environmental samples under a variety of conditions has recently become more practical due to remarkable advances in next-generation sequencing.

Changes leading to specific biological states including some of the more complex diseases can now be characterized with relative ease.

It is known that gut microbiota is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), mainly Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, exhibiting symptoms in the gastrointestinal tract.

Recent studies also showed increased frequency of oral manifestations among IBD patients, indicating aberrations in the oral microbiota.

Based on these observations, we analyzed the composition of salivary microbiota of 35 IBD patients by 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and compared it with that of 24 healthy controls (HCs).

The results showed that Bacteroidetes was significantly increased with a concurrent decrease in Proteobacteria in the salivary microbiota of IBD patients.

The dominant genera, Streptococcus, Prevotella, Neisseria, Haemophilus, Veillonella, and Gemella, were found to largely contribute to dysbiosis (dysbacteriosis) observed in the salivary microbiota of IBD patients.

Analysis of immunological biomarkers in the saliva of IBD patients showed elevated levels of many inflammatory cytokines and immunoglobulin A, and a lower lysozyme level. A strong correlation was shown between lysozyme and IL-1β levels and the relative abundance of Streptococcus, Prevotella, Haemophilus and Veillonella.

Our data demonstrate that dysbiosis of salivary microbiota is associated with inflammatory responses in IBD patients, suggesting that it is possibly linked to dysbiosis of their gut microbiota.

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This entry was posted in Autism, co-morbid, Immune System, Inflammation, Physiology, Treatment. Bookmark the permalink.

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