Serum Level of MDC and Autism

Elevated serum levels of macrophage-derived chemokine and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine in autistic children.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23782855

BACKGROUND:

In some autistic children, there is an imbalance of T helper (Th)1/Th2 lymphocytes toward Th2, which may be responsible for the induction of the production of autoantibodies in these children.

Th2 lymphocytes express CCR4 receptors. CCR4 ligands include macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC). They direct trafficking and recruitment of Th2 cells. We are the first to measure serum levels of CCR4 ligands in relation to the degree of the severity of autism.

METHODS:

Serum concentrations of MDC and TARC were measured, by quantitative sandwich enzyme immunoassay technique, in 56 autistic children and 32 healthy matched children.

RESULTS:

Autistic children had significantly higher serum levels of MDC and TARC than healthy controls (P <0.001 and P <0.001, respectively).

Children with severe autism had significantly higher serum levels of MDC and TARC than patients with mild to moderate autism (P <0.001 and P = 0.01, respectively).

In addition, there were significant positive correlations between CARS and serum levels of both MDC (P <0.001) and TARC (P <0.001) in children with autism.

There were significant positive correlations between serum levels of MDC and TARC in autistic children (P <0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Serum levels of CCR4 ligands were elevated in autistic children and they were significantly correlated to the degree of the severity of autism.

However, further research is warranted to determine the pathogenic role of CCR4 ligands in autism and to shed light on the therapeutic role of CCR4-ligand antagonism in autistic children.

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Chemokines are a group of small structurally related proteins that regulate cell trafficking of various types of leukocytes. The chemokines also play fundamental roles in the development, homeostasis, and function of the immune system, and they have effects on cells of the central nervous system as well as on endothelial cells involved in angiogenesis or angiostasis.[3]

C-C chemokine receptor type 4 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CCR4 gene.[1][2][3] CCR4 has also recently been designated CD194 (cluster of differentiation 194).

The protein encoded by this gene belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor family. It is a receptor for the following CC chemokines:

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