Folic Acid and Autism

Association between maternal use of folic acid supplements and risk of autism spectrum disorders in children.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23403681

Norwegian Institute of Public Health

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

Prenatal folic acid supplements reduce the risk of neural tube defects in children, but it has not been determined whether they protect against other neurodevelopmental disorders.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association between maternal use of prenatal folic acid supplements and subsequent risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) (autistic disorder, Asperger syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified [PDD-NOS]) in children.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS:

The study sample of 85,176 children was derived from the population-based, prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

The children were born in 2002-2008; by the end of follow-up on March 31, 2012, the age range was 3.3 through 10.2 years (mean, 6.4 years). The exposure of primary interest was use of folic acid from 4 weeks before to 8 weeks after the start of pregnancy, defined as the first day of the last menstrual period before conception.

Relative risks of ASDs were estimated by odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs in a logistic regression analysis. Analyses were adjusted for maternal education level, year of birth, and parity.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Specialist-confirmed diagnosis of ASDs.

RESULTS:

At the end of follow-up,

270 children in the study sample had been diagnosed with ASDs:

114 with autistic disorder,

56 with Asperger syndrome, and

100 with PDD-NOS.

In children whose mothers took folic acid, 0.10% (64/61,042) had autistic disorder, compared with 0.21% (50/24,134) in those unexposed to folic acid.

The adjusted OR for autistic disorder in children of folic acid users was 0.61 (95% CI, 0.41-0.90).

No association was found with Asperger syndrome or PDD-NOS, but power was limited.

Similar analyses for prenatal fish oil supplements showed no such association with autistic disorder, even though fish oil use was associated with the same maternal characteristics as folic acid use.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

Use of prenatal folic acid supplements around the time of conception was associated with a lower risk of autistic disorder in the MoBa cohort. Although these findings cannot establish causality, they do support prenatal folic acid supplementation.

———————–

Further Readings of Interest

Maternal periconceptional folic acid intake and risk of autism spectrum disorders and developmental delay in the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and Environment) case-control study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22648721

Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Davis, CAAbstract

BACKGROUND:

Periconceptional folate is essential for proper neurodevelopment.

OBJECTIVE:

Maternal folic acid intake was examined in relation to the risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and developmental delay (DD).

DESIGN:

Families enrolled in the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and Environment) Study from 2003 to 2009 were included if their child had a diagnosis of ASD (n = 429), DD (n = 130), or typical development (TD; n = 278) confirmed at the University of California Davis Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders Institute by using standardized clinical assessments. Average daily folic acid was quantified for each mother on the basis of dose, brands, and intake frequency of vitamins, supplements, and breakfast cereals reported through structured telephone interviews.

RESULTS:

Mean (±SEM) folic acid intake was significantly greater for mothers of TD children than for mothers of children with ASD in the first month of pregnancy (P1; 779.0 ± 36.1 and 655.0 ± 28.7 μg, respectively; P < 0.01). A mean daily folic acid intake of ≥600 μg (compared with <600 μg) during P1 was associated with reduced ASD risk (adjusted OR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.42, 0.92; P = 0.02), and risk estimates decreased with increased folic acid (P-trend = 0.001). The association between folic acid and reduced ASD risk was strongest for mothers and children with MTHFR 677 C>T variant genotypes. A trend toward an association between lower maternal folic acid intake during the 3 mo before pregnancy and DD was observed, but not after adjustment for confounders.

CONCLUSIONS:

Periconceptional folic acid may reduce ASD risk in those with inefficient folate metabolism. The replication of these findings and investigations of mechanisms involved are warranted.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Autism, Environment, Epidemiology, Neurology, Physiology, Treatment. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Folic Acid and Autism

  1. Pingback: Folic Acid and Autism | asdresearchinitiative | Autistic Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s