Autism and GI symptoms

Parent-Reported Gastro-intestinal Symptoms in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23371507

Children’s Neurosciences Department, Newcomen Child Development Centre, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Staircase D, St Thomas Hospital, Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7EH, UK.

Abstract

The objective of this study is to investigate whether parentally-reported gastro-intestinal (GI) symptoms are increased in a population-derived sample of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) compared to controls.

Participants included 132 children with ASD and 81 with special educational needs (SEN) but no ASD, aged 10-14 years plus 82 typically developing (TD) children. Data were collected on GI symptoms, diet, cognitive abilities, and developmental histories.

* Nearly half (weighted rate 46.5 %) of children with ASD had at least one individual lifetime GI symptom compared with 21.8 % of TD children and 29.2 % of those with SEN.

* Children with ASD had more past and current GI symptoms than TD or SEN groups although fewer current symptoms were reported in all groups compared with the past.

* The ASD group had significantly increased past vomiting and diarrhoea compared with the TD group and more abdominal pain than the SEN group.

* The ASD group had more current constipation (when defined as bowel movement less than three times per week) and soiling than either the TD or SEN groups.

No association was found between GI symptoms and intellectual ability, ASD severity, ASD regression or limited or faddy diet. Parents report more GI symptoms in children with ASD than children with either SEN or TD children but the frequency of reported symptoms is greater in the past than currently in all groups.

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Further readings of Interest

https://asdresearchinitiative.wordpress.com/2012/04/21/co-morbid-conditions-and-autism-harvard-medical/

“19.44% of ASD patients had epilepsy as compared to 2.19% in the overall hospital population (95% confidence interval for difference in percentages 13.58-14.69%), 2.43% of ASD with schizophrenia vs. 0.24% in the hospital population (95% CI 1.89-2.39%), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) 0.83% vs. 0.54% (95% CI 0.13-0.43%), bowel disorders (without IBD) 11.74% vs. 4.5% (95% CI 5.72-6.68%), CNS/cranial anomalies 12.45% vs. 1.19% (95% CI 9.41-10.38%), diabetes mellitus type I (DM1) 0.79% vs. 0.34% (95% CI 0.3-0.6%), muscular dystrophy 0.47% vs 0.05% (95% CI 0.26-0.49%), sleep disorders 1.12% vs. 0.14% (95% CI 0.79-1.14%).”

 

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