CDKL5 – MECP2 and a Mouse

Loss of CDKL5 disrupts kinome profile and event-related potentials leading to autistic-like phenotypes in mice.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23236174

Departments of Genetics, Neurology, Psychiatry, and Pharmacology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

Abstract

Mutations in the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene have been identified in neurodevelopmental disorders including atypical Rett syndrome (RTT), autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), and early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

The biological function of CDKL5 and its role in the etiology of these disorders, however, remain unclear. Here we report the development of a unique knockout mouse model of CDKL5-related disorders and demonstrate that mice lacking CDKL5 show autistic-like deficits in social interaction, as well as impairments in motor control and fear memory.

Neurophysiological recordings reveal alterations in event-related potentials (ERPs) similar to those observed in RTT and ASDs. Moreover, kinome profiling uncovers disruption of multiple signal transduction pathways, including the AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) cascade, upon Cdkl5 loss-of-function.

These data demonstrate that CDKL5 regulates signal transduction pathways and mediates autistic-like phenotypes and together establish a causal role for Cdkl5 loss-of-function in neurodevelopmental disorders.

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Further Readings

MECP2 – https://asdresearchinitiative.wordpress.com/?s=MECP2

Rapamycin (mTOR) – https://asdresearchinitiative.wordpress.com/?s=%28mTOR%29

Regulation of Immune Responses by mTOR

Jonathan D. Powell,1 Kristen N. Pollizzi,1,* Emily B. Heikamp,1,* and Maureen R. Horton2

1Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center

2Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine,

http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-immunol-020711-075024?journalCode=immunol

mTOR is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase that plays a central role in integrating environmental cues in the form of growth factors, amino acids, and energy. In the study of the immune system, mTOR is emerging as a critical regulator of immune function because of its role in sensing and integrating cues from the immune microenvironment. With the greater appreciation of cellular metabolism as an important regulator of immune cell function, mTOR is proving to be a vital link between immune function and metabolism. In this review, we discuss the ability of mTOR to direct the adaptive immune response. Specifically, we focus on the role of mTOR in promoting differentiation, activation, and function in T cells, B cells, and antigen-presenting cells.

This entry was posted in Autism, epilepsy, Neurology, Physiology, Treatment and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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